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Garden Hen

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Garden Hen
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Garden Hen
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Garden Hen _Desigend by pdbogen ( http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:230162 ) _Chickens are descended from the wild red jungle fowl of India and belong to the species Gallus gallus. They have been domesticated for at least 4,000 years. Only in about 1800, however, did chicken meat and eggs start to become mass-production commodities. Modern high-volume poultry farms, with rows of cages stacked indoors for control of heat, light and humidity, began to proliferate in Great Britain around 1920 and in the United States after World War II. The females (mature hens and younger pullets) are raised for meat and for their edible eggs; farmers have developed numerous breeds and varieties to fulfill commercial requirements. Mature males (cocks, or roosters) have long been used for sport (now outlawed in many jurisdictions), but most immature males (cockerels) are castrated (in modern times usually chemically, with hormones that cause atrophying of the testicles) to become meat birds, called capons. Originally, meat production was a by-product of egg production. Only hens that could no longer produce enough eggs were killed and sold for meat. By the mid-20th century, however, meat production had outstripped egg production as a specialized industry. _The male chicken is typically referred to as a cockerel but is known as a rooster in some countries such as Australia. A female chicken is called a hen and the little, fluffy yellow babies are called chicks. Chickens can live for up to 4 or 5 years in the wild but many commercially farmed chickens usually do not exceed the age of one. Many chickens have been known to live for longer and the oldest recorded chicken was said to live until it was 16 years old. _***Since antiquity chickens have been, and still are, a sacred animal in some cultures[49] and deeply embedded within belief systems and religious worship. The term "Persian bird" for the cock appears to been given by the Greeks after Persian contact "because of his great importance and his religious use among the Persians".In Indonesia the chicken has great significance during the Hindu cremation ceremony. A chicken is considered a channel for evil spirits which may be present during the ceremony. A chicken is tethered by the leg and kept present at the ceremony for its duration to ensure that any evil spirits present go into the chicken and not the family members. The chicken is then taken home and returns to its normal life.In ancient Greece, the chicken was not normally used for sacrifices, perhaps because it was still considered an exotic animal. Because of its valor, the cock is found as an attribute of Ares, Heracles, and Athena. The alleged last words of Socrates as he died from hemlock poisoning, as recounted by Plato, were "Crito, I owe a cock to Asclepius; will you remember to pay the debt?", signifying that death was a cure for the illness of life.The Greeks believed that even lions were afraid of cocks. Several of Aesop's Fables reference this belief.The chicken is one of the Zodiac symbols of the Chinese calendar. In Chinese folk religion, a cooked chicken as a religious offering is usually limited to ancestor veneration and worship of village deities. Vegetarian deities such as the Buddha are not recipients of such offerings. Under some observations, an offering of chicken is presented with "serious" prayer (while roasted pork is offered during a joyous celebration). In Confucian Chinese weddings, a chicken can be used as a substitute for one who is seriously ill or not available (e.g., sudden death) to attend the ceremony. A red silk scarf is placed on the chicken's head and a close relative of the absent bride/groom holds the chicken so the ceremony may proceed. However, this practice is rare today.
Additional Information

Additional Information

SKU 10000441
Length [mm] 95
Width [mm] 49.36
Height [mm] 82.16
Volume [cm³] 102.23
Area [cm²] 235.61
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