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Horse

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Horse
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Horse
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Horse _Desigend by ProCoPrint3D ( http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:313653 ) _Horse (Equus caballus), a hoofed, herbivorous mammal of the family Equidae. It comprises a single species, Equus caballus, whose numerous varieties are called breeds. Before the advent of mechanized vehicles, the horse was widely used as a draft animal, and riding on horseback was one of the chief means of transportation.In prehistoric times the wild horse was probably first hunted for food. Research suggests that domestication took place by approximately 6,000 years ago. It is supposed that the horse was first used by a tribe of Indo-European origin that lived in the steppes north of the chain of mountains adjacent to the Black and Caspian seas. Influenced by climate, food, and humans, the horse rapidly acquired its present form. _A mature male horse is called a stallion, the female a mare. A stallion used for breeding is known as a stud. A castrated stallion is commonly called a gelding. Formerly, stallions were employed as riding horses, while mares were kept for breeding purposes only. Geldings were used for work and as ladies’ riding horses. Recently, however, geldings generally have replaced stallions as riding horses. Young horses are known as foals; male foals are called colts and females fillies. _The extremely large eyes placed far back on the elongated head admirably suit the horse for its chief mode of defense: flight. Its long neck and high-set eyes, which register a much wider range than do the eyes of a human being, enable the horse to discern a possible threat even while eating low grasses. Like human vision, the horse’s vision is binocular, but only in the narrow area directly forward, and evidence suggests that it does not register colour.The senses of smell and hearing seem to be keener than in human beings. _From the dun of the primitive horse has sprung a variety of colours and patterns, some highly variable and difficult to distinguish. Among the most important colours are black, bay, chestnut (and sorrel), palomino, cream, and white. _The horse’s nervous system is highly developed and gives proof to varying degrees of the essential faculties that are the basis of intelligence: instinct, memory, and judgment. Foals, which stand on their feet a short while after birth and are able to follow their mothers within a few hours, even at this early stage in life exhibit the traits generally ascribed to horses. They have a tendency to flee danger. They express fear sometimes by showing panic and sometimes by immobility. Horses rarely attack and do so either when flight is impossible or when driven to assault a person who has treated them brutally. _The onset of adult sex characteristics generally begins at the age of 16 to 18 months. The horse is considered mature, depending on the breed, at approximately three years and adult at five. Fecundity varies according to the breed and may last beyond age 20 with Thoroughbreds and to 12 or 15 with other horses. The gestation period is 11 months; 280 days is the minimum in which the foal can be born with expectation to live. As a rule, a mare produces one foal per mating, twins occasionally, and triplets rarely. The foal is weaned at six months. _The first intensively domesticated horses were developed in Central Asia. They were small, lightweight, and stocky. In time, two general groups of horses emerged: the southerly Arab-Barb types (from the Barbary coast) and the northerly, so-called cold-blooded types. When, where, and how these horses appeared is disputed. Nevertheless, all modern breeds—the light, fast, spirited breeds typified by the modern Arabian, the heavier, slower, and calmer working breeds typified by the Belgian, and the intermediate breeds typified by the Thoroughbred—may be classified according to where they originated (e.g., Percheron, Clydesdale, and Arabian), by the principal use of the horse (riding, draft, coach horse), and by their outward appearance and size (light, heavy, pony).(http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/272156/horse)
Additional Information

Additional Information

SKU 10000256
Length [mm] 139.5
Width [mm] 38.13
Height [mm] 122.21
Volume [cm³] 128.53
Area [cm²] 238.32
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