Welcome to Like Figures!

×

Registration

Profile Informations

Shipping Address

Account

or login

First name is required!
Last name is required!
First name is not valid!
Last name is not valid!
This is not an email address!
Email address is required!
This email is already registered!
Password is required!
Enter a valid password!
Please enter 6 or more characters!
Please enter 16 or less characters!
Passwords are not same!
Terms and Conditions are required!
Street is required!
City is required!
Postcode is required!
Country required!
Email or Password is wrong!

Kangaroo

More Views

Kangaroo
$0.00

Availability: In stock

Kangaroo
STL Files
Description

Details

Kangaroo _Desigend by autodesk premium ( http://www.123dapp.com/123C-3D-Model/Red-Kangaroo-Male/595805 ) _Kangaroo, any of six large species of Australian marsupials noted for hopping and bouncing on their hind legs. The term kangaroo, most specifically used, refers to the eastern gray kangaroo, the western gray kangaroo, and the red kangaroo, as well as to the antilopine kangaroo and two species of wallaroo (see below). Less specifically, kangaroo refers to all 14 species in the genus Macropus, some of which are called wallabies. In its broadest usage, kangaroo refers to any member of the family Macropodidae, which comprises about 65 species, including tree kangaroos and the quokka; rat kangaroos belong to a “sister” family, Potoroidae. The Macropodidae are found in Australia (including Tasmania and other offshore islands, such as Kangaroo Island), New Guinea, and the islands east to the Bismarcks. Several species have been introduced into New Zealand. _With the exception of tree kangaroos (genus Dendrolagus), all members of the kangaroo family (Macropodidae) rely on long, powerful hind legs and feet for hopping and leaping, their predominant forms of locomotion. Their long tails, thickened at the base, are used for balancing. This feature is most obvious in the large kangaroos, which use the tail as a third leg when standing still. Each long, narrow hind foot has four toes, the large fourth toe bearing most of the animal’s weight. _ All macropodids are herbivorous and have a chambered stomach that is functionally similar to those of such ruminants as cattle and sheep. Ecologically, they occupy the niche filled elsewhere by grazing and browsing animals (larger species tend to be grazers, smaller ones browsers). Several smaller species have become extinct or are gravely endangered, probably because of predation by introduced foxes. The wedge-tailed eagle (Aquila audax) is one of the macropodids’ few natural predators. _In all species, the pouch is well developed, opens forward, and contains four teats. The young kangaroo (“joey”) is born at a very immature stage, when it is only about 2 cm (1 inch) long and weighs less than a gram (0.04 ounce). Immediately after birth, it uses its already clawed and well-developed forelimbs to crawl up the mother’s body and enter the pouch. The joey attaches its mouth to a teat, which then enlarges and holds the young animal in place. After continuous attachment for several weeks, the joey becomes more active and gradually spends more and more time outside the pouch, which it leaves completely at 7 to 10 months of age. _Kangaroos have an irregular activity rhythm; generally, they are active at night and during periods of low light, but it is quite possible to find them out in the open in bright sunlight. During hot weather, kangaroos lick their forearms, which promotes heat loss by evaporation. Kangaroos travel and feed in groups (“mobs”) whose composition shifts, but they are not truly social, since the individual members move at liberty.
Additional Information

Additional Information

SKU 10000801
Length [mm] 150
Width [mm] 32.71
Height [mm] 102.42
Volume [cm³] 46
Area [cm²] 121.49
Reviews