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Rhino

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Rhino
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Rhino
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Rhino _Designed by idea_beans ( http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:220971 ) _Rhinoceros (family Rhinocerotidae), plural rhinoceroses, rhinoceros, or rhinoceri, any of five species of giant, horn-bearing herbivores that include some of the largest living land mammals. Only African and Asian elephants are taller at the shoulder than the two largest rhinoceros species—the white, or square-lipped (Ceratotherium simum), and the Indian, or greater one-horned (Rhinoceros unicornis), rhinoceros. The white and the black (Diceros bicornis) rhinoceros live in Africa; the Indian, the Javan (Rhinoceros sondaicus), and the Sumatran (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) rhinoceros live in Asia. The precarious state of the five surviving species (all are endangered) is in direct contrast to the early history of this group as one of the most successful lineages of hoofed mammals. Today the total population of all five species combined is probably less than 25,000. Rhinoceroses today are restricted to eastern and southern Africa and to subtropical and tropical Asia. _Rhinoceroses are characterized by the possession of one or two horns on the upper surface of the snout; these horns are not true horns but are composed of keratin, a fibrous protein found in hair. Modern rhinoceroses are large animals, ranging from 2.5 metres (8 feet) long and 1.5 metres (5 feet) high at the shoulder in the Sumatran rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) to about 4 metres (13 feet) long and nearly 2 metres (7 feet) high in the white rhinoceros. Adults of larger species weigh 3–5 tons. _ Rhinoceroses are noted for their thick skin, which forms platelike folds, especially at the shoulders and thighs. All rhinos are gray or brown in colour, including the white rhinoceros, which tends to be paler than the others. Aside from the Sumatran rhinoceros, they are nearly or completely hairless, except for the tail tip and ear fringes, but some fossil species were covered with dense fur. The feet of the modern species have three short toes, tipped with broad, blunt nails. _The three Asian species fight with their razor-sharp lower outer incisor teeth, not with their horns. In Indian rhinoceroses such teeth, or tusks, can reach 13 cm (5 inches) in length among dominant males and inflict lethal wounds on other males competing for access to breeding females. The two African species, in contrast, lack these long tusklike incisors and instead fight with their horns. _The term rhinoceros is sometimes also applied to other, extinct members of the family Rhinocerotidae, a diverse group that includes several dozen fossil genera, among them the woolly rhinoceros (Coelodonta antiquitatis). Early rhinoceroses resembled small horses and lacked horns. (Horns are a relatively recent development in the lineage.) The largest land mammal ever to have lived was not an elephant but Indricotherium, a perissodactyl that was 6 metres (20 feet) long and could browse treetops like a giraffe.
Additional Information

Additional Information

SKU 10000260
Length [mm] 124.83
Width [mm] 41
Height [mm] 57.98
Volume [cm³] 74.31
Area [cm²] 137.4
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