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Seahorse

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Seahorse
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Seahorse
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Seahorse _Designed by YahooJAPAN ( http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:182265 ) _Sea horse (genus Hippocampus), any of about 36 species of marine fishes allied to pipefishes in the family Syngnathidae (order Gasterosteiformes). Sea horses are found in shallow coastal waters in latitudes from about 52° N to 45° S. Their habitats include coral reefs, mangroves, sea grass beds, and estuaries. They are unique in appearance, with their horselike head, prehensile tail, independently moving eyes, and brood pouch. They have long, tubular snouts and small, toothless mouths. Their bodies are covered with consecutive rings of bony plates. The name of the genus that contains sea horses is taken from the Greek words hippos (meaning “horse”) and kampos (meaning “sea monster”). _Sea horses vary in size, ranging in length from about 2 to 35 cm (about 0.8 to 14 inches). The smallest species, Denise’s pygmy sea horse (H. denise), is found in the tropical western Pacific from Indonesia to Vanuatu. The largest species, the pot-bellied sea horse (H. abdominalis), inhabits the waters off South Australia and New Zealand. _Male seahorses are equipped with a brood pouch on their ventral, or front-facing, side. When mating, the female deposits her eggs into his pouch, and the male fertilizes them internally. He carries the eggs in his pouch until they hatch, then releases fully formed, miniature seahorses into the water. _Because of their body shape, seahorses are rather inept swimmers and can easily die of exhaustion when caught in storm-roiled seas. They propel themselves by using a small fin on their back that flutters up to 35 times per second. Even smaller pectoral fins located near the back of the head are used for steering.They anchor themselves with their prehensile tails to sea grasses and corals, using their elongated snouts to suck in plankton and small crustaceans that drift by. Voracious eaters, they graze continually and can consume 3,000 or more brine shrimp per day.Population data for most of the world’s 35 seahorse species is sparse. _However, worldwide coastal habitat depletion, pollution, and rampant harvesting, mainly for use in Asian traditional medicine, have made several species vulnerable to extinction.
Additional Information

Additional Information

SKU 10000474
Length [mm] 46.11
Width [mm] 19.79
Height [mm] 120
Volume [cm³] 19.64
Area [cm²] 76.1
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