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Skull Lampshade - Voronoi Style

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Skull Lampshade - Voronoi Style
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Skull Lampshade - Voronoi Style
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Skull Lampshade - Voronoi Style _Designed by shiuan ( http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:518748 ) _In mathematics, a Voronoi diagram is a partitioning of a plane into regions based on 'closeness' to points in a specific subset of the plane. That set of points (called seeds, sites, or generators) is specified beforehand, and for each seed there is a corresponding region consisting of all points closer to that seed than to any other. These regions are called Voronoi cells. The Voronoi diagram of a set of points is dual to its Delaunay triangulation.It is named after Georgy Voronoy, and is also called a Voronoi tessellation, a Voronoi decomposition, a Voronoi partition, or a Dirichlet tessellation (after Peter Gustav Lejeune Dirichlet). Voronoi diagrams have practical and theoretical applications to a large number of fields, mainly in science and technology but even including visual art. _In the simplest and most familiar case (shown in the first picture), we are given a finite set of points {p1, …, pn} in the Euclidean plane. In this case each site pk is simply a point and its corresponding Voronoi cell (also called Voronoi region or Dirichlet cell) Rk consisting of every point whose distance to pk is less than or equal to its distance to any other site. Each such cell is obtained from the intersection of half-spaces, and hence it is a convex polygon. The segments of the Voronoi diagram are all the points in the plane that are equidistant to the two nearest sites. The Voronoi vertices (nodes) are the points equidistant to three (or more) sites. _As a simple illustration, consider a group of shops in a flat city. Suppose we want to estimate the number of customers of a given shop. With all else being equal (price, products, quality of service, etc.), it is reasonable to assume that customers choose their preferred shop simply by distance considerations: they will go to the shop located nearest to them. In this case the Voronoi cell \scriptstyle R_k of a given shop \scriptstyle P_k can be used for giving a rough estimate on the number of potential customers going to this shop (which is modeled by a point in our flat city). _As implied by the definition, Voronoi cells can be defined for metrics other than Euclidean (such as the Mahalanobis or Manhattan) distances. However in these cases the boundaries of the Voronoi cells may be more complicated than in the Euclidean case, since the equidistant locus for two points may fail to be subspace of codimension 1, even in the 2-dimensional case.Approximate Voronoi diagram of a set of points. Notice the blended colors in the fuzzy boundary of the Voronoi cells.A weighted Voronoi diagram is the one in which the function of a pair of points to define a Voronoi cell is a distance function modified by multiplicative or additive weights assigned to generator points. In contrast to the case of Voronoi cells defined using a distance which is a metric, in this case some of the Voronoi cells may be empty. A power diagram is a type of Voronoi diagram defined from a set of circles using the power distance; it can also be thought of as a weighted Voronoi diagram in which a weight defined from the radius of each circle is added to the squared distance from the circle's center. _Informal use of Voronoi diagrams can be traced back to Descartes in 1644. Peter Gustav Lejeune Dirichlet used 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional Voronoi diagrams in his study of quadratic forms in 1850. British physician John Snow used a Voronoi diagram in 1854 to illustrate how the majority of people who died in the Soho cholera epidemic lived closer to the infected Broad Street pump than to any other water pump.Voronoi diagrams are named after Ukrainian mathematician Georgy Fedosievych Voronyi (or Voronoy) who defined and studied the general n-dimensional case in 1908. Voronoi diagrams that are used in geophysics and meteorology to analyse spatially distributed data (such as rainfall measurements) are called Thiessen polygons after American meteorologist Alfred H. Thiessen. In condensed matter physics, such tessellations are also known as Wigner–Seitz unit cells. Voronoi tessellations of the reciprocal lattice of momenta are called Brillouin zones. For general lattices in Lie groups, the cells are simply called fundamental domains. In the case of general metric spaces, the cells are often called metric fundamental polygons. Other equivalent names for this concept (or particular important cases of it) : Voronoi polyhedra, Voronoi polygons, domain(s) of influence, Voronoi decomposition, Voronoi tessellation(s), Dirichlet tessellation(s).
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Additional Information

SKU 10000831
Length [mm] 150
Width [mm] 104.03
Height [mm] 112.12
Volume [cm³] 96.52
Area [cm²] 1054.5
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